Bases/ Stations


RCAF Station Moosenee, Ontario

Pinetree Line

15 December 1961.  Operational.

1 August 1975.  Closure.


RCAF Station Moss Bank, Saskatchewan

Location of No. 2 Bombing and Gunnery Scgool

Oct 28th, 1940. Formed

Dec 15th, 1944.  Closure

June 1942.  Location of No. 135 (F) Squadron.

    September 1945.  Closure.


RCAF Station Mount Pleasant, Prince Edward Island

Location of No. 10 Bombing and Gunnery Scgool

Sep 20th 1943. Formed

Jun 6th, 1945.  Closure


RCAF Station/ CFS Mountain View, Ontario

1936.  Location of Air Armament School.

May 1941.  Opened under the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan.  Location of No. 6 Bombing and Gunnery School (No. 6 B&GS).  The station was later re-designated RCAF Station Mountain View when No. 6 B&GS became known as the Ground Instruction School and was amalgamated with the Air Armament School No. 6 B&GS from RCAF Station Trenton.

Location of No. 6 Bombing and Gunnery Scgool

Jun 23rd 1941. Formed

Post War.  Closure

1946.  The RCAF Fire-fighting School moved to Mountain View from RCAF Station Trenton.

1947.  Both schools moved to RCAF Station Trenton.

1951.  The RCAF Fire-fighting School moved to RCAF Station Aylmer.

November 1951.  Closure of Air Armament School.

That same year, Mountain View was reduced to detachment RCAF Station Trenton.

Aircraft Battle Damage Repair

    Magazines

   


RCAF Station Namao/ CFB Edmonton, Alberta

August 1951.  Location of No. 3054 Technical Training Unit.

    December 1963.  Closure.

December 1953.  Location of No. 105 Communication and Rescue Flight.

    December 1958.  Closure.

December 1955.  2 RCAF squadrons ordered to transfer from RCAF Station Edmonton to RCAF Station Namao.

June 1957.  Location of No. 7 Supply Depot.

    December 1960.  Location of No. 10 Technical Services Unit.

    December 1964.  Closure.

Welcome to R.C.A.F. NAMAO booklet 1961

1 February 1968.  Integrated in the Canadian Armed Forces becoming CFB Edmonton.

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This is a repro, never had a Hercules with tail number 352

Magazine

Title    Air Show 86

Author None

ISBN    None

Title    Namao International Air Show

Author    None

ISBN    None

Title    A Journey Through Time - Namao International Air Show (1994)

Author None

ISBN   None

Hard Cover Soft Cover

 

Title    Air Show 1996

Author None

ISBN   None

    1 Air Movements Unit

   

        2 MAMS (Mobile Air Movements Section)

       

        8 MAMS (Mobile Air Movements Section)

       

        9 MAMS (Mobile Air Movements Section)

       

    1 AMU DET    Does anyone knows where it was?

       

1 AFMS (Aircraft Field Maintenance Squadron) (1970's)

   

4RSU

Location of Canadian Forces School of Traffic & Movement (CFSTM)

Location of 745 Communication Squadron

Work Dress

Combat

22 June 1994.  Command transferred to Land Forces Command.

1995 RCAF Reunion

1 Field Ambulance

    LVG

   

Military Aeronautical Communications System (MACS)


Nanaimo, BC

Location of 748 Communication Troop

Changed to 748 Communucation Squadron in 1994

Combat

 


Navan, Ontario

March 1944.  Location of No. 34 Radio Detachment.

    September 1944. Closure.


RCAF Station Neepawa, Manitoba

March 1942.  Location of No. 35 Elementary Flying Training School (RAF).

    January 1944.  Closure

February 1944.  Location of No. 26 Elementary Flying Training School.

    August 1944.  Closure.

March 1946.  Location of No. 5 Surplus Equipment Holding Unit.


New York, New York, USA

September 1943. Location of No. 2 Port Transit Unit.

    January 1944.  Closure.


Niagara Falls, Ontario

December 1944.  Location of No. 7 Convalescent Hospital

    December 1945.  Closure.


North Africa

June 1943.  Location of District Headquarters.

    February 1945. Closure.


RCAF Station North Battleford, Saskatchewan

July 1941.  Location of No. 35 Service Flying Training School (RAF).

    April 1944.   Closure

February 1944.  No. 13 Service Flying Training School reestablished from St. Hubert.

    May 1945. Closure.


RCAF Detachment North Bay, Ontario


RCAF Station/ CFB North Bay, Ontario

1942.  Opened.

December 1952.  Location of No. 5 Ground Observer Corps.

    May 1960.  Closure.

June 1955.  Location of No. 4015 Medical Unit (Aux).

    November 1955.  Closure.

June 1963.  Location of No. 131 Composite Unit.

    December 1963.  Closure.

 

Repro

1 February 1968.  Integrated in the Canadian Armed Forces becoming CFB North Bay.

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2 June 1989.  Location of 22 Radar Control Wing.

1993.  Renamed 22 Wing.

 

        Air Weapons Control and Countermeasures School

       

        21 AC & W Squadron (Aerospace Control and Warning)

       

            Charlie Crew

           

        51 ACW (OT) Squadron (Aerospace Control and Warning Operational Training Squadron)

       

        NORAD see CAF Higher Formations and Reserve Units       

Location of 707 Communication Squadron

Work Dress


North Luffenham, United Kingdom

August 1951.  Location of No. 1 (F) Wing.

    Early 1955.  Moved to Marville, France.   


RCAF Station North Sydney, Nova Scotia

December  1941.  Location of No. 1 Port Transit Unit.

    December 1946.  Closure.


Odihan, United Kingdom

October 1945.  Location of Station HQ.

    June 1946.  Closure.

November 1945.  Location of No. 120 Transport Wing HQ

    May 1946.  Closure.


Oldenburg, Germany

April 1945.  Location of No. 8402 Disarmament Wing..

    April 1946.  Closure.


RCAF Station Oshawa, Ontario

June 1941.  Location of No. 20 Elementary Flying Training School.

    October 1944.  Closure.


Ossington, United Kingdom

June 1944.  Location of No. 82 Operational Training Unit.

    December 1944.  Closure.


RCAF Station Ottawa (North)

1919.  Established as Rockcliffe Air Station.  Location of No. 3 Operations Squadron, and an aerial photographic survey unit, later re-named No. 7 General Purpose Squadron.

1930.  The RCAF Test Flight was formed at Rockcliffe.

    September 1939.  Re-named Test & Development Flight.

    January 1947.  Test & Development Flight re-designated Experimental & Proving Establishment.

    November 1952.  Experimental & Proving Establishment re-designated Central Experimental & Proving Establishment.

    1957.  The Central Experimental and Proving Establishment moved to Uplands.

Also during the 1930's, permanent married quarters and an aircraft hangar (hangar #1) were constructed, as was the "White House", the home of the RCAF Photographic Establishment.

January 1936.  Location of School of Army Co-Operation.

    December 1941.  Closure.

1936.  After going through several name changes, (RCAF Unit Ottawa, RCAF Technical Depot Stores), the station had was re-named Royal Canadian Air Force Station Ottawa.

January 1936.  Location of RCAF Photographic Establishment.

    March 1944.  Closure.

May 1937.  Location of No. 7 (G.P.) Squadron.

    September 1939.  Moved to Prince Rupert.

September 1939.  Location of  No. 17 Equipment Depot.

    January 1946.  Closure.

September 1939.  Location of No. 12 Communication Squadron

    June 1944.  Closure

1940.  This name change would be short lived as the station was again re-named RCAF Station Rockcliffe.  Some of the station's other units at this time consisted of  Air Transport Command, No. 124 Communications Squadron and the newly opened RCAF Hospital.

June 1940.  Location of No. 3 Manning Depot.

    December 1940.  Re-located to Edmonton.

1940 to ???.  Location of RCAF Flyers hockey team.

   

November 1941.  Location of No. 111 (F) Squadron.

    November 1943.  Closure.

December 1941.  Location of Conversion Training School.

    February 1943.  Closure.

14 February 1942.  Location of No. 124 (Ferry) Squadron.

   

    January 1944.  Closure.

March 1942.  Location of No. 7 Manning Depot.

    July 1944.  Closure.

April 1942.  Location of No. 132 (F) Squadron.

    September 1944.  Closure.

July 1942.  Location of No. 1 School of Fighter Control.

    February 1944.  Closure.

October 1942.  Location of No. 18 Repair Depot.

    December 1944.  Closure.

October 1942.  Location of No. 14 Aeronautical Inspection District.

    March 1943.  Closure.

1943.  The RCAF Women's Division Manning Depot relocated to Rockcliffe from Toronto.

1943.  The Heavy Transport Squadron was formed at Rockcliffe to deliver mail and other supplies using converted B-17 bombers.

March 1943.  Location of No. 1 Refresher Squadron.

    October 1943.  Closure.

October 1943.  Location of No. 168 (Heavy Transport) Squadron.

    March 1946.  Closure.

March 1944.  Location of No. 1 School of Bomber-Reconnaissance Control.

    August 1944.  Closure.

1945.  The RCAF's first jet fighter, a Gloster Meteor F-111, was test-flown at Rockcliffe.

5 February 1945.  The headquarters of No. 9 (Transport) Group was formed.

    1948.  Re-named Air Transport Command.

    1951.  The headquarters of Air Transport Command  moved to RCAF Station Lachine in August 1951.

April 1946.  Location of No. 1 Photo Establishment.

    December 1964.  Closure.

January 1947.  Location of No. 1 School of Photography.

    1950.  Re-located to RCAF Station Camp Borden.

1 April 1947. Location of 22 (Photographic) Wing.

    31 November 1949.  Disbanded.

October 1947.  Location of No. 901 Air Traffic Handling Unit.

    May 1950.  Closure

1949.  Location of No. 408 (Photo) Squadron, later re-named 408 Tactical Fighter Squadron.

    1964.  Moved to RCAF Station Rivers.

April 1949.  Air Material Command Headquarters was also located at Rockcliffe.

1950.   Rockcliffe gained a school when the Air Photo Interpretation Centre (APIC) was formed.

1950.  412 (Transport) Squadron, who have the distinction of being the first users in the world of jet passenger liners on scheduled transatlantic flights, also made Rockcliffe its home.

    1 September 1955.  412 (Transport) Squadron moved to RCAF Station Uplands.

June 1950.  Location of No. 2442 Aircraft Control and Warning.

    March 1961.  Closure.

November 1950.  Location of No. 2416 Aircraft Control and Warning.

    May 1961.  Closure.

15 December 1953.  Location of No. 22 (Photographic) Wing.

    1 April 1957.  Disbanded.

June 1954.  Location of No. 108 Communication Flight.

    May 1958.  Closure.

December 1954.  Location of RCAF Material Laboratory.

    1964.  Closure.

November 1955.  Location of Joint Photographic Intelligence Center.

    December 1964.  Closure.

February 1956.  Location of  No. 4 Communications Unit.

    December 1964.  Closure.

July 1956.  Location of Communication Control Headquarters.

    December 1964.  Closure.

June 1958.  Location of No. 5 (Helicopter) Operational Training Squadron.

    December 1958.  Closure .

December 1959.  Location of No. 3 Supply Depot.

    December 1963.  Closure.

1960.  APIC merged with the Joint Air Photo Interpretation School from RCAF Station Rivers and the centre became fully responsible for training photo-interpreters.

1960.  The predecessor of the current of the National Aviation Museum, originally opened at RCAF Station Uplands, moved to Rockcliffe in 1965 where it remains today.

1961.  The RCAF Hospital closed and was replaced by the National Defence Medical Centre, located outside downtown Ottawa.

1961.  Location of Joint Services Film Bureau.

    1964.  Closure.

1964.  Military flying ended at Rockcliffe, leaving behind a legacy of more than 40 years as a military flying station.  While RCAF Station Rockcliffe was now solely an administrative base, the airfield remained in use by the Rockcliffe Flying Club.

March 1964.  Location of Joint Services Motion Picture Center.

    December 1964.  Closure.

August 1965.  Air Material Command Headquarters disbanded.

End of 1965.  The collection of historic military aircraft at Rockcliffe moved into the hangers on the south end of the airfield.

   

North American Air Defense Command, Ottawa Sector

1 February 1968.  Integrated in the Canadian Armed Forces becoming CFB Rockcliffe.

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Location of 704 Communication Squadron

Work Dress

Combat

Location of 763 Communication Regiment

Work Dress

Combat

Location of 764 Communication Squadron

2 October 1972.  As a result of the Unification in 1968, the station was re-named CFB Rockcliffe, but this was changed when it was merged with CFB Uplands. Rockcliffe was designated CFB Ottawa (North) and the former RCAF Station Uplands in the south end of Ottawa, was re-designated CFB Ottawa (South).

   

        LVG

       

Canadian Air Force's International Training Programs (ITP)

Canadian Forces Electronic Warfare

    LVG

   

Canadian Forces Experimental Centre

Canadian Expeditionary Forces Command (CEFCOM)

Canadian Forces Liaison Council (Canadian business people who volunteer their time and effort to promote the Reserve Force)

Canadian Forces Photographic Unit

Canadian Space Agency CF Detachment

Directorate of Technical Airworthiness and Engineering Support

2 AFMS (Aircraft Field Maintenance Squadron)    

   

Joint Task Force 2

    LVG

   

    CADPAT

   

The 1970's saw a civilian regional passenger carrier operate briefly from the Rockcliffe airfield. Air Transit ran an Ottawa to Montreal flight service from 1974-1976, making it the only commercial passenger air service to have operated at Rockcliffe.

From 1970 - 1983, Parliament Hill's Ceremonial Guard used Hangar #1 as their headquarters and drill practice area.

1994.  Department of National Defence cutbacks in the early 1990’s saw many bases across Canada close or downsize and even though Rockcliffe was in the Nation’s capital, it was not spared a similar fate. Both Rockcliffe and Uplands closed.

Rockcliffe is now almost completely abandoned. Most of the buildings have been torn down and the roadways encircle empty weed-covered fields. The former RCAF hangars on the south side of the airfield were torn down in 1989.  Only the PMQ's, the Canadian Forces Housing Agency and the Military Family Resource Centre are still in use by the Canadian Forces at Rockcliffe. Some former military buildings are currently used as part of the National Research Council's campus. One of the buildings even has the Royal Canadian Corps of signals emblem in stone above a doorway. This building was once occupied by E Squadron of the Royal Canadian Corps of Signals.

Future plans call for the complete abandonment of Rockcliffe and consolidation of activities at National Defence Headquarters and small sections at Uplands. Some of the PMQ's have already been sold for civilian use. Other than the airfield, very little remains at Rockcliffe. The National Aviation Museum continues to serve as a permanent display facility for military and civilian aircraft at Rockcliffe.

In it's heyday, Rockcliffe had as many as 16 Air Force squadrons at any one time, more than any other Air Station in Canada.

NDHQ (National Defence Headquarters)

 

RCAF Ottawa (South)

June 1940.  Location of No. 2 Service Flying Training School under the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan.

    April 1945.  Closure.

    1947.  School closed, but flying training continued until in 1947, when the Station became home to Maintenance Command Headquarters.

Early 1950's.  Flying activities resumed at Royal Canadian Air Force Station Uplands with the arrival of various fighter squadrons, some of which were re-activated from World War II squadrons.

1 July 1952.  434 Fighter Squadron, originally a bomber squadron, re-formed at Uplands.

1953.  National Aeronautical Establishment (NAE) relocated from Arnprior.

1 January 1953.  422 Fighter Squadron re-formed at RCAF Station Uplands.

 27 August 1953.  422 Fighter Squadron re-located to 4 Wing Baden-Soellingen.

1 September 1955.  412 Transport Squadron, who have the distinction of being the first squadron to fly jet passenger liners on scheduled transatlantic flights, arrived from RCAF Station Rockcliffe.

1 November 1956.  410 Squadron, disbanded at 1 Wing in Marville, France re-formed at Uplands as an All-weather Fighter Squadron for the North American Air Defence Command.

    1 April 1964.  Squadron disbanded again.

1957.  The Central Experimental and Proving Establishment, later re-named the Aeronautical Evaluation and Test Establishment (AE & TE) moved to Uplands from Rockcliffe. Today the AE & TE is based at 4 Wing Cold Lake.

October 1960.  The predecessor of the current of the National Aviation Museum opened at RCAF Station Uplands.  Later on, its aircraft collection was merged with those of the RCAF and the Canadian War Museum.  This led to the creation of the National Aeronautical Collection.

1 September 1961.  439 "Saber Toothed Tiger" Squadron, the first squadron to use the F-16 jet fighter who, re-formed, as did 416 Linx Squadron.  Both Squadrons departed for Europe the following year, 439 Squadron to 1 Wing North Luffenham and 416 Squadron to 2 Wing Grostenquin, France.

Others who called Uplands home were 3 Air Movement Unit and 428 Ghost Squadron, who flew the Canadian designed Avro CF-100,  but transferred to 3 Wing Zweibrucken less than one year later.

1 August 1964.  426 Transport Squadron re-located to Uplands from RCAF Station Downsview.

1965.  The National Aeronautical Collection moved to Rockcliffe in 1965

    1968.  The National Aeronautical Collection came under the control of National Museum of Science and Technology.

1 February 1968.  Integrated in the Canadian Armed Forces becoming CFB Uplands.

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1970.   450 (Heavy Transport) Squadron, formerly No. 1 Transport Helicopter Platoon of the Royal Canadian Army Service Corps, moved to Uplands from RCAF Station St Hubert (along with their detachment from RCAF Station Namao) with their squadrons of Huey, Labrador, Voyageur and Chinook helicopters.  The Squadron was again re-designated, this time simply 450 (Transport) Helicopter Squadron.

    August 1994.  Squadron re-located to 1 Wing St. Hubert.

11 August 1971.  436 Transport Squadron re-located to CFB Trenton  where they currently fly the CC-130 Hercules aircraft.

The 1970' s and 1980's were a busy time for Uplands. The Canadian Forces Airborne Sensing Unit was established in 1971 to conduct testing using various aircraft including the CF-100 Canuck, Dassault Falcon and Dakotas. The unit was replaced by a civilian agency, the Canada Centre for Remote Sensing in 1975.

1972.  The name was again changed to CFB Ottawa (South).

By the 1980's, the Electronic Warfare Squadron, 414 Squadron at CFB North Bay had opened a detachment at CFB Ottawa (South). 412 (T) Squadron was providing air services for the Prime Minister, as well as VIP transportation around the world.

450 Helicopter Squadron, who were now the only combat ready Ottawa area squadron, were training as a part of the RCMP Special Emergency Response Team.

1982.   National Aeronautical Collection was renamed National Aviation Museum in 1982.

25 October 1982.  The first CF-18 fighter aircraft brought into service was presented to the Air Force by then-Prime Minister Pierre Trudeau at CFB Ottawa (S).

1994.  In the mid 1990's, a reorganization and consolidation occurred within the Canadian Military. Several bases were either downsized, merged or closed and even though Uplands was in the Nation’s capital, it was not spared a similar fate. As a result, both Uplands and Rockcliffe closed.

In their place, a support unit named Canadian Forces Support Unit Ottawa was established at Uplands and National Defence Headquarters to provide the local Reserve, Cadet and remaining Regular Force units with administrative and logistical support.

Today, only small sections at Uplands remain in military hands. The PMQ’s, the CF Band, the CF Photo Unit, the Military Police, the CFSU Transportation & Maintenance Section, the Central Material Traffic Terminal, the CF Crypto Support Unit and the Military Family Resource Centre remain at Uplands. Only one of the World War II hangers remain, as do two of the post-war “Arch” hangers and assorted administrative buildings, but large sections of the former base contain only empty fields.

3 Air Movements Unit (3 AMU)

   

412 (Transport) Squadron downsized from 120 personnel to only 29, and relocated to the civilian side of the former Uplands airport. Their current Headquarters, The Pilot Officer John Gillespie Magee Jr Annex officially opened on 11 January 1995. Transport Canada now has the responsibility for the maintenance of the Squadron's remaining four CC-144 Challenger jets. The airfield remains in use as the Ottawa International Airport.

Defence Research and Development Canada


RCAF Station Pagwa, Ontario

Pinetree Line

1953.  Opened as Pagwa Air Force Station of the United States Air Force.

March 1963.  Transferred to the RCAF.  Home of No. 37 Aircraft Control & Warning Squadron.  Re-named RCAF Station Pagwa.

December 1966.  Closed


RCAF Station Parent, Quebec

Pinetree Line

October 1950.  Opened.  With radar functions being run by No. 207 RCAF Radio Station.

The radar unit was later re-designated 14 Aircraft Control & Warning Squadron.

March 1964.  Closed.


RCAF Station Patricia Bay, British Columbia

26 October 1939.  Established when the aerodrome at Patricia Bay was taken over by the RAF and RCAF.

During World War II, Patricia Bay was an extremely busy base. The station was divided into three sections: the West Camp, the East Camp and the Seaplane base.

19 May 1940.  The Seaplane base housed a detachment from No. 111 Coastal Artillery Co-operation (No. 111 CAC) who relocated from RCAF Station Sea Island, becoming the first squadron to be stationed at Patricia Bay.

    August 1940.   Re-designated No. 111 (Fighter) Squadron.

February 1941.  Location of No. 3 Coastal Artillery Co-Operation Flight.

    March 1943.  Closure.

June 1941.  No. 120 (BR) Squadron relocated from Regina.

    January 1944.  No. 120 (BR) Squadron moved to Coal Harbour.

March 1941.  No. 122 (Composite) Squadron, with their C-126 Noorduyn Norsemans, and a detachment of the Royal Norwegian Naval Air Force, who arrived for seaplane training.  The Ground Warfare School and No. 1 School of Flying Control ran short courses at the station.

July 1941.  Location of No. 32 Operational Training Unit (RAF).

January 1942.  Location of No. 122 (Composite) Squadron.

    September 1945.  Closure.

May 1942.  No. 13 Operational Training Unit (RCAF), No. 115 (Fighter) Squadron, with their C-22 Fairchild Bolingbrokes until re-deployed to Annette Island.

July 1942.  No. 132 (Fighter) Squadron arrived at the station.

August 1942.  Location of No. 1 School of Flying Control.

November 1942.  Location of No. 149 (Torpedo Bomber) Squadron.

    March 1944.  Closure.

November 1942.  Location of No. 3 Operational Training Unit.

9 November 1942.  The West Camp housed No. 3 Operational Training Unit.

    3 August 1945.  Closure.

1943.  No. 133 Squadron who re-located form Boundary Bay.

January 1943.  Location of No. 7 Radio Detachment.

   October 1945. Closure.

April 1944.  No. 8 (B.R.) Squadron relocated from Sea Island.

    May 1945.  Closure of No. 8 (B.R.) Squadron.

1 June 1944.  The East Camp housed No. 32 Operational Training Unit (Royal Air Force) until it re-located to RCAF Station Comox. No. 6 Operational Training Unit was established in its place.

July 1944, an Air Cadet Camp was established at Patricia Bay and a month later, the station became a temporary movie studio when MGM arrived to film scenes for the film "Son of Lassie."

December 1944.  Location of WAC Marine Squadron.

    October 1946.  Closure.

 

31 March 1945.  RCAF Station Patricia Bay closed.

September 1945.  Closure of No. 11 (B.R.) Squadron.

Some of the other units during and after WWII were: No. 135 (Fighter) Squadron, No. 149 (Bomber Torpedo) Squadron, No. 7 Radio Detachment, the 1st Battalion, Edmonton Fusiliers, the 9th & 10th Anti-aircraft Batteries of the Royal Canadian Artillery.

August 1946.  Closure of No. 1 School of Flying Control.

14 November 1946.  The Victoria Flying Club took over the hangars once occupied by 32 OUT at the East Camp.

April 1947.  Location of No. 122 Marine Squadron.

    May 1952.  Closure.

May 1948.  The Federal Department of Transportation assumed control of the aerodrome, naming it the Sydney Airport.

1950.  The airport was re-named the Victoria International Airport.

1 December 1953.  VC-922 Squadron, Royal Canadian Naval Air Reserve was formed at Patricia Bay and manned by reservists from HMCS Malahat Naval Reserve Division in Esquimalt.

1954.  The Royal Canadian Navy assumed control of the West Camp as a naval air station.

1 November 1954.  RCN VU-33 Squadron, a lodger unit of Canada's West Coast Navy Station HMCS Naden, was formed, equipped with a fleet of CP121 Trackers and CT133 Silver-Star jet trainers. VU-33 Squadron was given the responsibility of conducting ship gunnery practice and radar calibration, coastal surveillance, search and rescue and Sonobouy Proving and Testing Service (SPATS).

    August 1974.  VU-33 Squadron re-located to CFB Comox.

1985.  443 Anti-submarine Warfare Helicopter Squadron, originally from CFB Shearwater, re-located to the Victoria Airport to provide Sea King helicopter support aboard 2 Navy Frigates and one Helicopter Destroyer stationed at CFB Esquimalt - Naden. The Squadron took over the quarters once occupied by VU-33 Squadron.

    31 January 1995.  443 Squadron changed their name to 443 Maritime Helicopter Squadron.


Patrick Air Force Base, Florida, USA

December 1961.  Location of Central Experimental and Proving Establishment.

    November 1962.  Closure.


RCAF Station Paulson, Manitoba

Location of No. 5 Bombing and Gunnery Scgool

Jun 23rd 1941. Formed

Feb 2nd.  Closure


RCAF Station Pearce, Alberta

February 1942.  Location of No. 36 Elementary Flying Training School.

    August 1942.  Closure.


RCAF Station Pendleton, Ontario

October 1940.  Location of No. 10 Elementary Flying Training School.

    September 1945.  Closure.


RCAF Station/ CFB Penhold, Alberta

Pinetree Line

1940.  Originally established 11 miles southeast of Red Deer, Alberta.

April 1941.  Location of No. 2A Manning Depot.

    July 1941.  Closure.

28 September 1941.  The Royal Air Force took over the property and formed No. 36 Service Flying Training School as part of the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan.

    3 November 1944.  School and the airfield closed and only a military radio station remained on site at the time.

September 1944.  Location of No. 2 Technical Signals Unit.

    October 1945.  Closure.

25 May 1953.  The station re-opened as RCAF Station Penhold and became home to No. 4 F. T. S. (Flying Training School), a NATO Flying Training School.

In later years, the station would be home to a cadet camp an Air Cadet glider training school and an Air Reserve Training Centre.

By the late 1950’s, the threat of a nuclear war had become so great that the Canadian government decided to construct a secret underground bunker to house the major elements of the government in the event of an emergency.  Most Provincial Governments followed suit by building their own bunkers. The Alberta Government chose RCAF Station Penhold for the site of their bunker, staffed by 703 (743??) Communication Squadron and also housing the Provincial Warning Centre.  A 77,000 square foot bunker was secretly constructed at the station and opened in 1964.

All Government bunkers had a remote communications bunker, located some distance away.  This second bunker, usually a single story structure, was staffed exclusively by communications personnel.  Penhold’s remote communications bunker (17,000 square feet) was constructed several miles south of the station.

43 Radar Squadron opened a Pinetree radar long-range station in February 1964 at a site 14 miles east of RCAF Station Penhold, who provided support to the facility.

In May 1965, flying operations ceased at RCAF Station Penhold and Air Defence Command assumed control of the Station. The only flying training done at the base was the summer Regional Air Cadet Glider Training School that opened the next year at Penhold. The former RCAF Detachment Innisfail, occupied since June 1960 by the Innisfail Flying Club, once again served as a relief landing field.

1965.  Penhold's airfield was taken over by the city of Red Deer and operated as the Red Deer Regional Airport, remaining so today.

1 February 1968.  Integrated in the Canadian Armed Forces becoming CFB Penhold.

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By 1973, the CF Junior Leadership School and the FPS-27 Radar School had opened at the base.

In the early 1980's, the Air Cadet School began making use again of the former RCAF Detachment Netook as an alternate airfield to the Gliding School at Innisfail.

1985.   DND announced that the Pinetree Line would be shut down as a part of the North American Air Defence Modernization Plan. Radar equipment at many Canadian Forces Stations was replaced with a new automated system. 

23 June 1986.  The schools remained at the base until disbanded.

By 1986, the Gliding School moved permanently to Netook.

Location of 743 Communication Squadron

Work Dress

Pin

As a result of the new automated system and overall reductions in Canada's Air Force, 43 Radar Squadron disbanded on 1 August 1986 and the radar site was closed.

1990.  CFB Penhold was downsized to a Detachment of CFB Edmonton

1995.  In the mid 1990's, a reorganization and consolidation occurred within the Canadian Military. Several bases were either downsized, merged or closed and as a result, Detachment Penhold closed.  The communications facility was automated and the personnel responsible for running it were transferred to CFB Edmonton.

June 2001.  The bunker was demolished.

The airfield is now the Red Deer Regional Airport.


RCAF Station Pennfield Ridge, New Brunswick

July 1941.  Location of No. 2 Air Navigation School.

    April 1942.  Closure.

April 1942.  Location of No. 34 Operational Training Unit (RAF).

    May 1944.  Closure.

June 1942.  Location of No. 2 Operational Training Unit.

    August 1942.  Closure.

July 1944.  Location of Operational Training Squadron and Transport Conversion Squadron.

    July 1945.  Closure.

October 1945.  Closed.


Petawawa

Location of 702 Communication Squadron

Work Dress

Combat


Peterborough, Ontario

November 1942.  Location of No. 3 District Headquarters.

    July 1945. Closure.


Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA

April 1954.  Location of No. 2 RCAF Requirements Unit.

    November 1954.  Closure.

August 1944.  Location of No. 2 Requirements Detachment.

    July 1945.  Closure.


CAMP/ RCAF Station Picton, Ontario

November 1940.  Location of No. 1A Manning Depot.

    March 1941.  Closure.

December 1940.  Location of Conversion Training Squadron (formerly Refresher Training Flight).

    November 1941.  Closure.

Location of No. 31 Bombing and Gunnery Scgool

Apr 28th 1941. Formed

Nov 17th, 1944.  Closure

18 November 1944.  Location of No. 5 Reserve Equipment Maintenance Unit.

    January 1946.  Closure.

The Royal Canadian School of Artillery then took over the aerodrome, although the RCAF kept a small detachment on site.

1 July 1961.  The aerodrome officially became Camp Picton and the Royal Canadian School of Artillery shortly afterwards.  The camp then became home to the 1st Battalion, Canadian Guards.

1 February 1968.  Integrated in the Canadian Armed Forces becoming CFB Picton.

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September 1969.  Closed.


Plymouth, Nova Scotia

October 1943.  Location of No. 21 Radio Detachment.

    September 1944. Closure.


Point Mugu, California, USA

June 1958.  Location of Central Experimental and Proving Establishment.

    December 1958.  Closure.


RCAF Station Port Albert, Ontario

October 1940.  Location of No. 31 Air Navigation School (RAF).

    February 1945.  Closure.


Port aux Basques, Newfoundland

December 1943.  Location of No. 32 Radio Detachment.

    September 1945. Closure.


Port Dufferin, Nova Scotia

December 1944.  Location of No. 22 Radio Detachment.

 

    September 1945. Closure.


RCAF Station Port Hardy, British Columbia

April 1941.  Location of No. 21 Staging Unit.

    January 1946.  Closure.


RCAF Station Port of Basques, Newfoundland


RCAF Station/ CFB Portage La Prairie, Manitoba

January 1940.  Location of No. 1 Manning Depot.

    March 1946.  Re-located to Toronto.

October 1940.  Location of  No. 14 Elementary Flying Training School, a part of the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan.

    June 1942.  Disbanded.

April 1941.  Location of No. 7 Air Observer School.

    31 March 1945.  Closure.

April 1945.  Location of No 3 Air Navigation School.

    31 August 1945.  Closure.

March 1946.  No. 1 Manning Depot re-located the Toronto Exhibition Grounds to recruit new pilots.  However, this too would be short-lived as the Manning Depot closed one year later.

April 1947.  Location of No. 2 Radio Wave Propagation Unit.

    July 1948.  Closure.

The station continued to be occupied by No. 2 Construction Maintenance Unit as a storage depot.

1949.  The station closed and only a small caretaker staff remained. The Federal Department of Transportation assumed control of the airfield.

RCAF Station Portage La Prairie assumed responsibility for RCAF Station MacDonald, which continued operating until 30 November 1963 when the Depot closed.

15 September 1952.  RCAF Station Portage La Prairie re-opened. 

October 1952.  Arrival of No. 2 Advanced Flying School (No. 2 AFS) from RCAF Macdonald, Manitoba.

Jet flying training began in 1953 with the arrival of the Lockheed designed T-33 Silver Stars but by 1964, propeller driven aircraft training replaced the jet trainers.

8 June 1959.  Arrival of 1 Flying Instructor School (FIS) from RCAF Trenton, Ontario.

In 1959 RCAF Station Portage La Prairie assumed responsibility for the storage depot detachment established at the former RCAF Station MacDonald.

August 1964.  No. 2 A.F.S. relocated to RCAF Station Moose Jaw,  but the station gained two schools that same month.  No. 1 Advanced Flying School re-located from RCAF Station Rivers as did No. 1 Flying Instructors School (basic) from RCAF Station Moose Jaw, making Portage La Prairie a centre for pilot selection, basic helicopter training and flight instructor training for both RCAF and Royal Canadian Navy pilots.  No. 1 AFS was later re-named No. 3 Flying Training School.

RCAF Station Portage La Prairie was also the home of two of the RCAF’s precision flying teams, The Red Knights from 1959-1969 and the Golden Centenaries from 1966-1968.

31 August 1964.  Basic FIS arrives from Moose Jaw, Saskatchewan and combines with Advanced FIS.

1965.  No. 3 Advance Flying School, originally from RCAF Station Gimli, re-opened at Portage La Prairie.

13 October 1966.  FIS starts up as a detachment of CFS.

31 August 1967.  CFS amalgamates with CFNS.

1 February 1968.  Integrated in the Canadian Armed Forces becoming CFB Portage La Prairie.

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Dragonflies Aerobatic Team (Kiowa Helicopter 1972 - 1982 and Jet Ranger Helicopter 1982 - 1992 )

Musket Gold Aerobatic Team

31 March 1970.  The base gained a school when the newly designated No. 3 Canadian Forces Primary Flying Training School moved to the base from Camp Borden, Ontario.

    LVG

   

July 1971.   No. 2 Canadian Forces Flying Training School moved to CFB Moose Jaw.

    RWTS

   

        LVG

       

    Basic Helicopter School

   

        LVG

       

Book

Title    Portage La Prairie  Fifty Years of Flying Training: 1940-1990

Author Major G.E.I. Greavette

ISBN    1-55056-004-2

1 September 1992.  Closed.

 

Although no longer an Air Force base, No. 3 Canadian Forces Flying Training School, a Detachment of 17 Wing Winnipeg, remains at the former base to oversee Primary Flight Training and Helicopter Training, conducted by the Canadian Aviation Training Centre.  A permanent contingent of 41 military personnel remains at the former base.

Canadian Aviation Training Centre (Bombardier)

Allied Wings and Canadian Helicopters

 

Phase I      Aircraft:  Slingsby T-67 Firefly

                   

                        LVG

                       

        Replaced by: Grob 120A

                   

                        LVG

                       

Phase II     Aircraft: Raytheon CT-156 Harvard II

                   

                        LVG

                       

Phase III    Aircraft: Bell 206 Jet Ranger

                   

                        LVG

                       

                    or Raytheon C90A King Air

                                           

                        LVG

                       

                        Replaced by: Raytheon C90B King Air

                       

                            LVG

                                

                    or Bell 412 CF (formerly CH-146 Griffons)

                       

                        LVG

                       

                    or BAE CT-155 Hawk

                   

                        LVG

                       

 

 

 

    LVG

   

Contracted Flying Training and Support (CFTS)

     

        LVG

       

       


Preston, Nova Scotia

June 1942.  Location of No. 1 Radio Detachment.

    November 1945. Closure.


RCAF Station Prince Albert, Saskatchewan

July 1940.  Location of No. 6 Elementary Flying Training School.

    November 1944.  Closure.

March 1941.  Location of No. 6 Air Observer School.

    September 1942.  Closure.

November 1944.  Location of RCAF Army Co-operation Unit.

    March 1945.  Closure.


RCAF Station Prince George, British Columbia

October 1945.  Location of Signals Unit.

    July 1946.  Closure.


RCAF Station Prince Rupert, British Columbia

November 1941.  Established as the home of No. 7 Bomber-Reconnaissance Squadron.

    March 1944.  Squadron re-located to RCAF Station Alliford Bay.

    September 1945.  Closure.

April 1944.  Location of No. 2 Filter Detachment.

    November 1944.  Closure.

November 1945.  Location of No. 11 Surplus Equipment Holding Unit.

    April 1946.  Closure.


RCAF Station Puntzi Mountain, British Columbia

Pinetree Line

1952.  Opened as Puntzi Mountain Air Force Station of the United States Air Force, with the radar functions being run first by No. 917 Aircraft Control & Warning Squadron, then 55 AC &W Squadron.

November 1962.  Transferred to the RCAF.

December 1964.  Closure.


Quebec, Quebec

1935.  Location of No. 21 (Fighter) Squadron (Auxiliary).

August 1940  Location of No. 4 Manning Depot.

    October 1941.  Closure.

September 1941.  Location of No. 8 Air Observer School and No. 22 Elementary Flying Training School.

    April 1945.  Closure.

March 1943.  Location of No. 1 Air Gunners Ground Training School.

    January 1944.  Closure.

January 1944.  Location of No. 2 Aircrew Graduate Training School.

    January 1945.  Closure.

July 1945.  Location of No. 503 Reserve Equipment Maintenance Unit.

October 1947.  Location of RCAF Liaison Office.

December 1951.  Location of No. 2452 Aircraft Control and Warning.

    December 1961.  Closure.

1954.  Location of Central Experimental and Proving Establishment.

    December 1963.  Closure.

June 1959.  Location of No. 4014 Medical Unit (Aux).

    February 1964.  Closure.

Location of 713e Escadron de Communication

Work Dress

Combat


Queensport, Nova Scotia

September 1942.  Location of No. 5 Radio Detachment.

    June 1945. Closure.


Rabat, Morocco


RCAF Station Ramore, Ontario

Pinetree Line

1952.  Opened as Sioux Lookout Air Force Station of the United States Air Force, with the radar functions being run by No. 912 Aircraft Control & Warning Squadron.

October 1961.  Transferred to the RCAF.  Home of No. 39 Aircraft Control & Warning Squadron.  Re-named RCAF Ramore.

1 February 1968.  Integrated in the Canadian Armed Forces becoming CFS Ramore.

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1975.  Closed.


Red Deer, AB

Location of 749 Communication Squadron

Work Dress

Combat


RCAF Station Regina, Saskatchewan

1935.  Location of No. 19 (Bomber) Squadron (Auxiliary).

1935.  Location of No. 20 (Bomber) Squadron (Auxiliary).

    November 1937.  Closure.

November 1937.  Location of No. 120 (BR) Squadron.

    May 1941.  Squadron moved to Patricia Bay.

June 1940.  Location of No. 2 Initial Training School.

    November 1944.  Closure.

September 1940.  Location of No. 3 Air Observer School.

    June 1943.  Closure.

November 1940.  Location of No. 15 Elementary Flying Training School.

    August 1944.  Closure.

April 1941.  Location of No. 14 (X) Depot.

    December 1944.  Closure.

Sept 1944.  Location of No. 404 Aircraft Holding Unit.

    November 1944.  Closure.

November 1944.  Location of No. 6 Release Center.

    November 1945.  Closure.

September 1952.  Location of No. 4017 Medical Unit (Aux).

    May 1955.  Closure.

Location of 734 Communication Squadron

Work Dress

Combat


RCAF Detachment Resolute Bay, North West Territories

December 1952.  Opened.

    May 1964.  Closure.


RCAF Station Resolution Island, North West Territories

Pinetree Line

1954.  Opened as Resolution Island Air Force Station of the United States Air Force, with the radar functions being run by No. 920 Aircraft Control & Warning Squadron.

    1961.  Closure.

1991.  Re-activated by the Canadian Government as an unmanned North Warning System radar site.


RCAF Station/ CFB Rivers, Manitoba

May 1937.  Location of No. 1 Air Navigation School.

    April 1942.  Closure.

May 1942.  Opened under the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan .

July 1944.  Location of No. 1 Central Navigation School.

    July 1945.  Closure.

1947.  The Canadian Parachute Training Centre, established at Camp Shilo in 1942, merged with the Airborne School of the Canadian Joint Air Training Centre and re-located to RCAF Station Rivers, making the station Canada’s main para-training centre.  Also in 1947, the Army Aviation Tactical Training School was established at Rivers to provide pilot training to Army aviators, as well as helicopter instructor training for the Army, RCN and RCAF.  No. 6 Signal Regiment, Royal Canadian Corps of Signals and the Air Support Signals Unit provided communications duties at Rivers.

1947.  The first helicopter employed by military forces in Canada was the RCAF’s Sikorsky H-5 (S-51).  RCAF Station Rivers used the H-5 as a rotary wing trainer, but it was also used by the Royal Canadian Air Force in search and rescue roles.

April 1947.  Location of Canadian Joint Air Training Center.

   

    December 1964.  Closure.

1 October 1947.  444 Air Observation Post Squadron was formed.

    1 April 1949.  Disbanded.

1948.  The Joint Air Photo Interpretation School opened.

    1960.  The Joint Air Photo Interpretation School closed and its personnel merged with the Air Photo Interpretation Centre at RCAF Station Rockcliffe, who became fully responsible for training photo-interpreters.

August 1953.  The Basic Helicopter Training Unit (BHTU) was established at RCAF Station Rivers, initially to train RCAF pilots, but by 1956, Army helicopter pilots were also training at Rivers.  After the closure of the helicopter school at RCN Air Station HMCS Shearwater, the Royal Canadian Navy began sending trainees to Rivers as well, making the BHTU the first tri-service flying training unit in Canada.

December 1963.  Location of No. 1 Transport Helicopter Platoon (No. 1 THP), a unit of the Royal Canadian Army Service Corps, along with their fleet of CH-113A Voyageur transport helicopters and one CH-112 Nomad.  The platoon's function was to support the Army on field exercises.

    1966.  Moved to RCAF Station St. Hubert, but also established a detachment at RCAF Station Namao.

    1968.  Re-designated 450 (Heavy Transport) Helicopter Squadron.

1964.  408 Tactical Fighter Squadron, whose primary functions were reconnaissance and weapons delivery, moved to Rivers  from RCAF Station Rockcliffe.

    1 April 1970.  Disbanded.

1 February 1968.  Integrated in the Canadian Armed Forces becoming CFB Rivers.

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Closed in 1971


Rocky Point, BC

Location of Rocky Point Ammunition Depot


RCAF  Station Saglek, Labrador

Pinetree Line

Fall 1953.  Operational.

30 June 1970.  Closure.


RCAF Detachment Saint John, New Brunswick

1939.  Established at the Millidgeville Airport, near Saint John.

No. 2 (Army Cooperation) Squadron was posted to the station until 1940.

No. 118 (Coastal Artillery Co-operation) Squadron from replaced No. 2 ACS until April 1944.

    No 118 CAC transferred to RCAF Station Dartmouth and later disbanded.

1944.  Closed.


Saint John, New Brunswick

1 April 1938.  Location of No. 117 (Fighter) Squadron (Auxiliary).

October 1940.  Location of No. 1 Coastal Artillery Co-Operation Flight.

    July 1943.  Closure.

April 1944.  Location of No. 502 Holding Unit.

    January 1945.  Closure.


Sandspit, British Columbia

November 1945.  Location of Signals Unit.

    July 1946.  Closure.


Sardinia, Ontario

June 1959.  Location of Air Weapons Unit.

    December 1964.  Closure.


RCAF Station Saskatoon, Saskatchewan

1940.  The Federal Government took over the Saskatoon Municipal Airport for use as an RCAF training facility.

October 1940.  No. 4 Service Flying Training School officially opened as part of the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan.

    June 1945.  Closure.

November 1941.  Location of No. 7 Initial Training School.

1947.  406 (Lynx) Squadron, a fighter squadron that had been adopted by the City of Saskatoon during WWII, was re-activated as a light bomber squadron in the RCAF Auxiliary (Reserve).  Officially re-named 406 (Lynx) City of Saskatoon Squadron, the squadron took up residence in several of the former No. 4 SFTS buildings.

June 1950.  RCAF Station Saskatoon re-opened as an air training facility.  No. 23 Wing was formed to oversee 406 (Lynx) Squadron and several other Auxiliary (Reserve) Squadrons in Western Canada.

1 January 1952.  No. 1 Advance Flying School opened at the station, one of the many Flying Training Schools opened across Canada to train RAF, RCAF and NATO aircrews. Students at the school trained on Mitchell Bombers and Expeditor aircraft trainers. Other lodger units at the station included, No. 3043 Technical Training Unit (Auxiliary) and No. 4002 Medical Unit (Auxiliary).

    1 October 1962.  Moves to Rivers, Manitoba

June 1955.  Location of No. 3043 Technical Training Unit.

    February 1964.  Closure.

December 1955.  Location of No. 23 Wing HQ (Aux).

    March 1964.  Closure.

1 July 1959.  Location of 1 Central Flying School (C.F.S.).

1962.  Control of RCAF Station Saskatoon was transferred from Training Command to Air Transport Command.

December 1963.  Closure of RCAF Station Saskatchewan.  Both 406 Squadron and 23 Wing were disbanded.

RCAF Detachment No. 1005 Technical Support Depot was established at the site, occupying four of the station’s hangars. The Detachment served as a disposal and storage facility for disused aircraft, including the C119 Flying Boxcar, Expeditor, Neptune and Harvard trainers and the Yukon Transport aircraft. In fact, it was at No. 1005 TSD that the last five Harvard aircraft in the RCAF inventory were brought for disposal.

No. 1005 Technical Support Depot, re-named 407 Technical Services Detachment after the Unification, remained at the Saskatoon Airport until 1978, when the Air Force finally departed Saskatoon.

Location of 737 Communication Squadron

Work Dress

Combat


Sawmill Bay, North West Territories

February 1950.  Location of No. 214 Loran Unit.

    August 1950.  Closure.


RCAF Station Scoudouc, New Brunswick.

1940.  Originally established in as a relief landing field for No. 8 Service Flying Training School at Lakeburn.

September 1941.  Location of No. 4 Repair Depot.

    February 1945.  Re-located to RCAF Station Dartmouth.

September 1941.  Location of No. 1 Radio Direction Finding Maintenance Unit** (No. 1 RFD MU), a top-secret maintenance unit.

    1943.  No. 1 RFD MU merged with No. 1 Repair Depot's Radio Repair Section.

July 1945.  The station was re-named RCAF Station Scoudouc.  A new repair depot was formed at the site, as was No. 1 Maintenance Wing and No. 101 RCAF Equipment Park.  These units were short-lived however, as they disbanded on 1 November 1945. The RCAF departed and the aerodrome was abandoned.

1951.  Re-activated as a Detachment of RCAF Station Chatham.  No. 5 Supply Depot, located in downtown Moncton, opened a section at the newly christened RCAF Detachment Scoudouc.

While RCAF Station Chatham's runways were being repaired, No. 1 (Fighter) Operational Training Unit temporarily occupied space the detachment and 2 years later, the Royal Canadian Navy did the same while RCN Air Station Shearwater's airfield was being repaired

1965.  Closed.


RCAF Station Sea Island,  British Columbia.

5 October 1932.  Location of No. 11 (Army Co-operation) Squadron (Auxiliary).

January 1937.  Location of No. 6 (B.R.) Squadron.

    June 1940.  Closure.

December 1937.  Location of No. 111 (CAC) Squadron.

    July 1940.  Closure.

March 1939.  Location of No. 3 Repair Depot.

    October 1945.  Closure of No. 3 Repair Depot

August 1939.  Location of No. 13 Aeronautical Inspection District.

    January 1947.  Closure.

February 1940.  Location of No. 13 Operational Training Squadron.

    October 1942.  Closure.

July 1940.  Location of No. 8 Elementary Flying Training School.

    December 1941.  Closure.

July 1940.  Location of No. 2 Equipment Depot.

    November 1953.  Closure of No. 2 Equipment Depot.

22 July 1940.  Established beside the Vancouver Airport  under the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan as No. 8 Elementary Flying Training School.

1940.  No. 13 Operational Training Squadron was also established at the aerodrome.

    November 1940.  Squadron re-located to RCAF Station Patricia Bay.

March 1941.  Location of No. 9 Construction and Maintenance Unit.

August 1941.  Location of No. 117 (BR) Squadron.

    November 1943.  Closure.

January 1942.  No. 8 (G.P.) Squadron relocated from Sea Island.

January 1942.  No. 8 EFTS re-located to Boundary Bay and became part of No. 18 EFTS.

April 1942.  Location of No. 8 (B.R.) Squadron.

    April 1944.  Squadron moved to Patricia Bay.

July 1942.  Location of No. 147 (BR) Squadron.

    March 1944.  Closure.

August 1942.  Location of No. 8 Radio Detachment.

    September 1945. Closure.

January 1943.  Location of Western Air Command

1943.  Location of No. 2 Technical Landline Training School.

    1945.  Closure.

March 1943.  Location of No. 163 (Transport) Squadron.

    March 1944.  Closure.

April 1943.  Location of No. 2 Radio Direction Finding Maintenance Unit.

    October 1943.  Closure.

April 1943.  Location of No. 32 Repair Depot.

    October 1943.  Closure.

May 1943.  Location of No. 160 (BR) Squadron.

    May 1945.  Closure.

June 1943.  Location of No. 165 (T) Squadron.

    October 1945.  Closure.

November 1943.  Location of WAC Marine Squadron.

    October 1946.  Closure.

December 1943.  Location of Air Priorities Control Unit.

    May 1945.  Closure.

October 1944.  Location of No. 22 Sub-Repair Depot.

    November 1945.  Closure.

January 1945.  Location of No. 8 Release Center.

    July 1946.  Closure.

November 1945.  Location of No. 7 Reserve Equipment Maintenance Unit.

    March 1946.  Closure.

April 1946.  Location of No. 9442 Detachment.

    November 1949.  Closure.

The station remained open after World War II and was re-named RCAF Station Sea Island, but this was later changed to RCAF Station Vancouver. 

15 April 1946.  442 Squadron was re-activated as a 442 “City of Vancouver” Auxiliary Fighter Squadron at Sea Island, but was later re-designated an Auxiliary Transport Squadron.

    1 December 1951.  Squadron split in half to form 443 “City of New Westminster” Squadron.

January 1948.  Location of No. 123 Rescue Unit.

    May 1953.  Closure.

121 Composite Flight (KU) was also formed at Sea Island.

1948.  Sea Island’s runways were linked up with those of the Vancouver Airport.

March 1948.  Location of Flying Boat Conversion School.

    April 1954.  Closure.

June 1949.  Location of 12 Group Rescue Co-ordination Center.

    November 1962.  Closure.

1950.  Location of No. 4001 Medical Unit (Aux).

    November 1963.  Closure.

October 1950.  Location of No. 19 Wing HQ (Aux).

    March 1964.  Closure.

March 1951.  Location of No. 4000 Medical Unit (Aux).

    May 1963.  Closure.

March 1952.  Location of No. 4016 Medical Unit (Aux).

    May 1963.  Closure.

1953.  Location of No. 1 Ground Observer Corps.

    March 1960.  Closure.

December 1954.  Location of No. 5003 Intelligence Unit.

    May 1958.  Closure.

May 1955.  Location of No. 1 Communications Unit.

    December 1964.  Closure.

September 1955.  Location of No. 3001 Technical Training Unit.

    December 1963.  Closure.

December 1960.  Location of No. 4007 Medical Unit (Aux).

    February 1964.  Closure.

1963.  Location of No. 11 Air Movements Unit.

    1964.  Closure.

121 KU Squadron moved to RCAF Station Comox, where in 1968, it was renamed 442 Transport and Rescue Squadron, but 442 Squadron and 443 Squadron disbanded.

Effective 1 November 1966, 74 Communication Group West with its Headquarters in Vancouver, was formed and 732 Communication Squadron was re-designated as 742 Communication Squadron  . The Squadron was formed through an amalgamation of elements of Number 2 Communications Unit of the Royal Canadian Air Force and the Alberta Signal Squadron of the Canadian Army Signal System. On the formation of Canadian Forces Communication Command in 1970, the Squadron became a unit of 74 Communication Group. On 20 February 1996 an agreement was signed to form a consolidated Garrison Telecommunications and Information Systems Organization. The agreement placed all resources of 742 Communication Squadron under the operational control of the Commander, Edmonton Garrison. In turn, the existing Base Telecommunications and Information Systems Unit was placed under the operational control of the Commanding Officer, 742 Communication Squadron.

742 Communication Squadron is responsible for the operation and maintenance of strategic communications in Alberta and British Columbia. The Squadron also provides for the provision and maintenance of telecommunications support and Automated Data Processing (ADP) management services for Edmonton Garrison and associated units. Taskings include the processing of all incoming and outgoing message traffic at the communication facility in Edmonton and Wainwright. The Cold Lake and Yellowknife detachments were transferred to different Commands in April 1998, and Suffield was transferred in April 1999 . The Squadron also operates the Military Aeronautical Communication System (MACS) site in Edmonton, which is part of a high frequency radio system that provides communications for military aircraft, SAR support message services, weather information, and phone patch services. Additionally, the Squadron also operates the Western Gateway, one of two high power high frequency radio stations in Canada, communicating with Canadian Units deployed overseas on missions with the United Nations.

On April 18th, 1998 742 Communication Squadron was transferred from DISO to under command of Chief of Land Staff and renamed 742 Signal Squadron.

The Squadron’s Troops provide all technical support for the above resources.

The Squadron Crest which was approved in 1981, is the Bulldog which symbolizes the faithful service that the Squadron gives to its users and the perseverance shown by the Squadron personnel in the completion of their mission. This theme is supported by the Squadron’s motto - Perseveramus, which is latin for We Persevere. The Aurora Boreales represents the Squadron’s extensive involvement in the Canadian Arctic and the color of the crest is common to all Canadian Forces Communication Units.

(Article above taken from http://www.dutyandvalour.com/wiki/742_Signal_Squadron)

 

 

Location of 744 Communication Squadron

Combat


RCAF Station Senneterre, Quebec

Pinetree Line

1 June 1953.  Home of No. 34 Aircraft Control & Warning Squadron.

1 August 1988.  Closed.