Squadrons

110 Sqn to 242 Sqn


No. 110  "City of Toronto" Squadron (Auxiliary)    Squadron Code AY

    5 October 1932.  Authorized as No. 10 (Army Co-operation) Squadron (Auxiliary) at Toronto, Ontario.

    October 1934.  Commenced flying training with four Moth aircraft.

    15 April 1937.  Affiliation with Toronto was recognized when the title "City of Toronto" was officially incorporated into its designation.

    15 November 1937.  Renumbered No. 110 Squadron.

    10 September 1939.  Mobilized and assigned to the Canadian Active Service Force for overseas duty with the 1st Division.

    17 December 1939.  Moved to Rockcliffe, Ontario, trained on the Lysander aircraft.

    February 1940.  Left for England.

    1 March 1941.  Renumbered No. 400 Squadron at Odiham, Hampshire.


No. 111 Squadron (Auxiliary)        Squadron Code LZ

    5 October 1932.  Authorized as No. 11 (Army Co-operation) Squadron (Auxiliary) at Vancouver, British Columbia.

    October 1934.  Commenced flying training with four Moth aircraft.

    15 November 1937.  Renumbered No. 111 (Coast Artillery Co-operation) Squadron.

    10 September 1939.  Mobilized.

    May 1940.  Moved to Patricia Bay, British Columbia.  Flew the Lysander aircraft.

    14 June 1940.  Re-designated Fighter but not converted.   

    1 February 1941.  Disbanded.


No. 112 Squadron (Auxiliary)        Squadron Code XO

    5 October 1932.  Authorized as No. 12 (Army Co-operation) Squadron (Auxiliary) at Winnipeg, Manitoba.

    September 1934.  Commenced flying training with four Moth aircraft.

    15 November 1937.  Renumbered No. 112 Squadron.

    10 September 1939.  Mobilized and assigned to the Canadian Active Service Force for overseas duty with the 1st Division.

    June 1940.  Left for England .

    9 December 1942.  Re-designated No. 2 (Fighter) Squadron at Digby, Lincolnshire.

    1 March 1941.  Renumbered No. 402 (Fighter) Squadron.


No. 113 Squadron (Auxiliary)     Squadron Code BT  

    1 January 1937.  Authorized as No. 13 (Army Co-operation) Squadron (Auxiliary) at Calgary, Alberta.

    15 November 1937.  Re-designated No. 113 (Fighter) Squadron.

    1 October 1939.  Disbanded.


No. 114 Squadron (Auxiliary)    Squadron Code FD

    1 January 1937.  Authorized as No. 14 (Army Co-operation) Squadron (Auxiliary) at London, Ontario.

    20 October 1939.  Disbanded.


No. 115 Squadron (Auxiliary)        Squadron Code BK

    1 September 1934.  Authorized as No. 15 (Fighter) Squadron (Auxiliary) at Montreal, Quebec.

    May 1936.  Commenced flying training with four Moth aircraft.

    15 November 1937.  Renumbered No. 115  Squadron.

    26 May 1940.  Disbanded in Montreal, Quebec, its personnel absorbed by No. 1 (Fighter) Squadron at Dartmouth, Nova Scotia.


115 Air Transport Unit


No. 116 Squadron        Squadron Code NO

    1 April 1938.  Authorized as a Coast Artillery Co-operation unit at Halifax, Nova Scotia.

    1 May 1939.  Re-designated Fighter.

    2 November 1939.  Disbanded.


No. 117 Squadron    Squadron Code EX

    1 April 1938.  Authorized as a Fighter unit at Saint John, New Brunswick.

    1 May 1939.  Re-designated Coast Artillery Co-operation.

    28 October 1939.  Disbanded.


No. 118 Squadron        Squadron Code RE

    1 September 1934.  Authorized as No. 18 (Bomber) Squadron (Auxiliary) at Montreal, Quebec.

    May 1936.  Commenced flying training with four Moth aircraft.

    15 November 1937.  Renumbered No. 118  Squadron.

    28 October 1939.  Re-designated Coast Artillery Co-operation and Ordered to Saint John, New Brunswick.  Flew the Lysander aircraft.

    8 August 1940.  Re-designated Fighter, but not converted.

    27 September 1940.  Disbanded.


No. 119 Squadron    Squadron Code DM

    15 May 1935.  Authorized as No. 19 (Bomber) Squadron (Auxiliary) at Hamilton, Ontario.

    May 1937.  Commenced flying training with four Moth aircraft.

    15 November 1937.  Renumbered No. 119  Squadron

    31 October 1939.  Re-designated Bomber Reconnaissance.  Flew the Bolingbroke and Hudson aircraft.

    8 August 1940.  Re-designated Fighter, but not converted.

    15 March 1944.  Disbanded in Sydney, Nova Scotia.   


No. 120 Squadron (Auxiliary)    Squadron Code MX

    1 June 1935.  Authorized as No. 20 (Bomber) Squadron (Auxiliary) at Regina, Saskatchewan.

    1 April 1937.  Commenced flying training with four Moth aircraft.

    15 November 1937.  Renumbered No. 120 Squadron.

    31 October 1939.  Re-designated Bomber Reconnaissance.  Flew  the Delta, Hudson, Stranraer, Canso A and Catalina aircraft.

    1 May 1944.  Disbanded at Coal Harbour, British Columbia.


No. 121 Squadron (Auxiliary)    Squadron Code JY

    1 Jan 1937.  Authorized as No. 21 (Bomber) Squadron (Auxiliary) at Quebec City, Quebec.

    15 November 1937.  Renumbered No. 121 Squadron.

    30 September 1939.  Disbanded.


No. 122 Squadron    Squadron Code AG

    10 January 1942.  Formed as a Composite unit at Patricia Bay, British Columbia by amalgamating Western Air Command's Coast Artillery Co-operation Flight and Communications Flight.

    November 1944.  Added an Air Rescue Flight when it received two modified Hudson aircraft with airborne lifeboats.

    15 September 1945.  Disbanded.


No. 123 Squadron    Squadron Code VD

    22 October 1941.  Formed as the School of Army Co-operation at Rockcliffe, Ontario.  Flew the Lysander and Harvard aircraft.

    15 January 1942.  Re-designated No. 123 (Army Co-operation Training) Squadron.

    1 January 1944.  Renumbered No. 439 Squadron (Fighter Bomber) Squadron at Wellingore, Lincolnshire, England.


No. 124 Squadron

    1 January 1942.  Formed as the Air Force Headquarters Ferry Squadron at Rockcliffe, Ontario.

    14 February 1942.  Renumbered No. 124 (Ferry) Squadron.

       

    15 November 1942.  Reorganized into:

                                                                        Eastern Division with headquarters at Rockcliffe, Ontario and,

                                                                        Western Division with headquarters at Winnipeg, Manitoba.

                                                                              1 March 1944.  Became on  no. 170 Squadron. 

                                                                              At the end of the war, No. 170 was disbanded.

                                                                                  Became the Western Detachment of No. 124 Squadron.

                                                                                  Disbanded on 30 September 1946.


No. 125 Squadron    Squadron Code BA

    20 April 1942.  Formed as Fighter unit at Sydney, Nova Scotia.  Flew the Hurricane aircraft.

    8 February 1944.  Renumbered No. 441 (Fighter) Squadron at Digby, Lincolnshire, England.


No. 126 Squadron BV

    27 April 1942.  Formed as Fighter unit at Dartmouth, Nova Scotia.  Flew the Hurricane aircraft.

    31 May 1945.  Disbanded.


No. 127 Squadron    Squadron Code TF

    1 July 1942.  Formed as Fighter unit at Dartmouth, Nova Scotia.

    8 February 1944.  Renumbered No. 443 (Fighter) Squadron at Digby, Lincolnshire, England.


No. 128 Squadron    Squadron Code RA

    7 June 1942.  Formed as Fighter unit at Sydney, Nova Scotia. Flew the Hurricane aircraft.

    15 March 1944.  Disbanded at Torbay, Newfoundland.


No. 129 Squadron    Squadron Code HA

    28 August 1942.  Formed as Fighter unit at Dartmouth, Nova Scotia.  Flew the Hurricane aircraft.

    30 September 1944.  Disbanded at Gander, Newfoundland.


No. 130 Squadron    Squadron Code AE

    1 May 1942.  Formed as Fighter unit at Mont-Joli, Quebec.  Flew the Hurricane aircraft.

    15 March 1944.  Disbanded at Goose Bay, Labrador.


No. 132 Squadron    Squadron Code ZR

    14 April 1942.  Formed as Fighter unit at Rockcliffe, Ontario.  Flew the Kittyhawk aircraft.

    30 September 1944.  Disbanded at Sea Island, British Columbia.


No. 133 Squadron    Squadron Code FN

    3 June 1942.  Formed as Fighter unit at Lethbridge, Alberta.  Flew the Hurricane,  Kittyhawk and Mosquito aircraft.

    10 September 1945.  Disbanded at Patricia Bay, British Columbia.


No. 135 Squadron    Squadron Code XP

    15 June 1942.  Formed as Fighter unit at Mossbank, Saskatchewan.  Flew the Hurricane and Kittyhawk aircraft.

    10 September 1945.  Disbanded at Patricia Bay, British Columbia.

   


No. 145 Squadron    Squadron Code EA

    30 May 1942.  Formed as a Bomber Reconnaissance unit at Torbay, Newfoundland.  Flew the Hudson and Ventura aircraft.

    30 June 1945.  Disbanded at Dartmouth, Nova Scotia.

   


No. 147 Squadron    Squadron Code SZ

    1 July 1942.  Formed as a Bomber Reconnaissance unit at Sea Island, British Columbia.  Flew the Bolingbroke aircraft.

    15 March 1945.  Disbanded at Tofino, British Columbia.


No. 149 Squadron    Squadron Code ZM

    26 October 1942.  Formed as a Torpedo unit at Patricia Bay, British Columbia, was to be equipped with Bristol Beauport aircraft.

    Summer 1943.  Redesigned Bomber Reconnaissance, re-equipped with Ventura aircraft.

    15 March 1945.  Disbanded at Terrace, British Columbia.   


No. 160 Squadron    Squadron Code AN

    3 May 1943.  Formed as a Bomber Reconnaissance unit at Sea Island, British Columbia.

    July 1943.  Moved to Yarmouth, Nova Scotia, flew the Canso aircraft.

    15 June 1945.  Disbanded at Torbay, Newfoundland.


No. 161 Squadron    Squadron Code TN

    28 April 1943.  Formed as a Bomber Reconnaissance unit at Dartmouth, Nova Scotia.  Flew  the Digby and Canso aircraft.

    31 May 1945.  Disbanded at Yarmouth, Nova Scotia.


No. 162 Squadron    Squadron Code GK and DZ

    19 May 1942.  Formed as a Bomber Reconnaissance unit at Yarmouth, Nova Scotia.  Flew  the Canso A aircraft.

    1 January 1944.  Lent to RAF Coastal Command and stationed in Iceland.

    June and July 1944.  Operated in Wick, Scotland.

    7 August 1945.  Disbanded at Sydney, Nova Scotia.

   
     


No. 163 Squadron

    1 March 1943.  Formed as an Army Co-operation unit at Sea Island, British Columbia.  Flew the Bolingbroke and Harvard aircraft.

    June 1943.  Converted to Hurricane aircraft.

    14 October 1943.  Re-designated Fighter and re-equipped with the Kittyhawk aircraft.

    15 March 1944.  Disbanded at Patricia Bay, British Columbia.


No. 164 Squadron

    23 January 1943.  Formed as an Transport unit at Moncton, New Brunswick.  Flew the Lodestar and Dakota aircraft.

    1 August 1946:  Reorganized into two transport units:

            No. 426 Squadron

            No. 435 Squadron


No. 165 Squadron

    13 July 1943.  Formed as an Transport unit at Sea Island, British Columbia , flew the Lodestar and Dakota aircraft.

     1 November 1945.  Disbanded.


No. 166 Squadron

    16 September 1943.  Formed as an Communication unit at Sea Island, British Columbia.

    31 October 1945.  Disbanded.


No. 167 Squadron

    15 August 1943.  Formed as an Communication unit at Dartmouth, Nova Scotia.

    1 October 1945.  Disbanded.


No. 168 Squadron

    18 October 1943.  Formed as an Heavy Transport unit at Rockcliffe, Ontario, flew the Fortress and Liberator aircraft.

    26 April 1946.  Disbanded.


No. 170 Squadron

    1 March 1944.  Formed as an Ferry unit at Winnipeg, Manitoba.

    1 October 1945.  Disbanded.


242 Canadian (F) Squadron

15 August 1918 from No's 408, 409 and 514 Flights at Newhaven.  Flew the Short 184 seaplanes.

15 May 1919.  Disbanded

30 October 1939.  Reformed at Church Fenton as fighter unit composed of mainly Canadian personnel it was issued with Blenheims, which were exchanged for Hurricanes in January 1940.  From its base at Church Fenton, it operated a detachment in France from 16 May but on the 20th, the squadron moved to Biggin Hill 16 June when its detachment it was evacuated.  Severely depleted by the actions in France it was withdrawn to Coltishall to rest and recuperate and it was here that it received a new CO, Squadron Leader Douglas Bader.

Re-equipped and recovered it entered the Battle of Britain remaining at Coltishall throughout, although it often operated from advanced bases such as Duxford. It eventually moved to Duxford in October but a month later was back at Coltishall.  From December it began fighter sweeps and bomber escort mission over France and these were maintained throughout 1941.   In October it was withdrawn from operations and began preparations for deployment overseas, in this case the Far East..

Arriving in Singapore in January 1942, it was too late to stop the Japanese advance and it was soon withdrawn to Sumatra and later Java, but as casualties increased and spares diminished the squadron began to get dispersed and by the end of February 1942, it had practically ceased to exist.  A new 242 Squadron formed at Turnhouse on 10 April with Spitfires, which were flown on defensive patrols initially in Scotland and then the North of England until August when it moved south to North Weald.  However, by October it was again earmarked for overseas, leaving  for North Africa in November, where it operated in support of the 1st Army's advance to Tunisia.

With the end of operations in North Africa, the squadron over to Malta in June 1943, where it supported the Allied landing in Sicily then moved onto that island to support the invasion of Italy.  In September it transferred to the Italian mainland until April 1944 when it moved to Corsica in preparation for the forthcoming invasion of southern France.  However, following the invasion, the squadron only remained on French soil for a month and in September it disposed of its aircraft to other units and the personnel returned to Naples in Italy, where it disbanded on 4 November 1944.

15 November 1944.  Reformed as a transport unit at Stoney Cross, equipped with Wellington XVIs for training, its operational equipment arriving in February 1945 in the form of Stirling Vs.  These were used to fly freight to the Middle East and then onto the Far East.  Some Yorks arrived in April and these were used to carry passengers as well as freight but then in July the Yorks left and the Stirling Vs were replaced by Stirling IVs which needed modifying before being of any use.  However, in December the squadron moved to Merryfield and reverted to Yorks, which now employed on flights to India and the Azores.  In 1948, the squadron joined the Berlin Airlift, after which it converted to the Hastings in June 1949 and reverted to its Far East routes.

 1 May 1950.  Disbanded at Lyneham.